Tag Archives: japan

Rogue Image of the Week: July 9, 2012

Cruiser | Usa Beach, Okinawa, Japan
Canon EOS 7D + Sigma 10-20mm
120s/ f8/ ISO 800
Moonrise | Usa Beach, Okinawa, Japan
Canon EOS 7D + Canon EF 70-300mm
30s/ f11/ ISO 640

Happy Monday!  This week’s Rogue Images were made by me on Usa Beach in Okinawa Japan during a perfect climbing/ surfing/ spearfishing/ beach cruising weekend.  All participants were successfully able to:  fire up | get dirty | scare yourself | bleed.  Enjoy.  -JW

Do you have an image that would look stellar featured here on Thrive Outdoors?  Send ’em on over to thriveoutdoors@yahoo.com!  Be sure to tell us a bit about the shot: where it was taken, what it was taken with, camera settings, why it’s so awesome, etc…  If selected, we’ll make sure to give credit where credit’s due, and link to whatever site you would like.

富士山 (Fuji San) in Pure Form

Fuji-san is a big deal.  It’s the highest point on all of Japan’s islands.  It’s on the ¥1000 note.  It’s the subject of countless photos, paintings, woodblock prints, poems… blog posts.

Katsushika, Hokusai, 1760-1849, artist | Teahouse at Koishikawa the morning after a snowfall
Between 1890 and 1940. Source: Library of Congress

富士山 may well be the world’s most climbed mountain- 250-300k people climb it every year.  The vast majority of these attempt it during the “official climbing season” of July and August.  At times, especially during Obon week, people have to wait in queues just to get to the next station. Continue reading 富士山 (Fuji San) in Pure Form

1,247 Reasons to Get a Reusable Water Container

On the small island of Okinawa, Japan there is an active community of climbers consisting of US service members and local Japanese nationals.  A favorite climb/boulder hangout is Gushichan beach on the South end of the island.  Not only is this beach home to hundreds of potential bouldering problems and even a few sport routes, it is one of many significant WWII historical sites on the island.  This beach is subject to busloads of tourists, typhoons, and multiple ocean currents.  Inevitably, it ends up trashed.

We met, one drizzly overcast day, to clean the place up.  This follow up to the original post documents the success: Continue reading 1,247 Reasons to Get a Reusable Water Container