Tag Archives: Thrive

Keep The Faith

On 30 June 2009, PFC Bowe Bergdahl was taken captive by the Taliban in Afghanistan.  He is currently the only service member still in captivity in either Iraq or Afghanistan.

There is plenty of rhetoric against the circumstances of Bowe’s capture.  He’s been called many things.  Among them:  Deserter, and Traitor.  We don’t know exactly what happened to Bowe, and neither do any of the folks that speak out against him so quickly.

For the skeptics we offer some words from a keen White House official:

“Frankly, we don’t give a shit why he left.  He’s an American soldier. We want to bring him home.”

And a few words from the document that is the base-line guidance for this kind of situation:  Executive Order 10631, “Code of Conduct for Members of the Armed Forces of the United States,” August 17, 1955, as amended.

Article VI. I WILL NEVER FORGET THAT I AM AN AMERICAN, FIGHTING FOR FREEDOM, RESPONSIBLE FOR MY ACTIONS, AND DEDICATED TO THE PRINCIPLES WHICH MADE MY COUNTRY FREE. I WILL TRUST IN MY GOD AND IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.

“No American prisoner of war will be forgotten by the United States. Every available means will be employed by our Government to establish contact with, to support and to obtain the release of all our prisoners of war. Furthermore, the laws of the United States provide for the support and care of dependents of the Armed Forces including those who become prisoners of war. I assure dependents of such prisoners that these laws will continue to provide for their welfare.”

This past Saturday marked the 3 year anniversary of Bowe’s capture.  A few of us wanted to remind everyone that he was still out there.  A couple of us even showed under “less than sufficient sleep cycles,” after a long Friday night.  It was painful, but worth it…

This one’s for you, Soldier.  You Are Not Forgotten.

  • Showtime:  0700
  • Participants:  6 US Service Members
  • Distance:  54 cumulative miles (9 mi each)
  • Weight in Rucks:  270 cumulative pounds (45 lbs in each pack)
  • Heat Index:  96.9 degrees F
  • Humidity:  84%

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For more information check out these links:

Support and info page for Bowe:  supportbowe.org

A recent, well written article from Rolling Stone

Facebook support pages for Bowe:

Waiting and Advocating for Sgt Bowe Bergdahl. US Army – POW

Waiting-for Bowe (Waiting-for Bowe Bergdahl)

Bring Bowe Bergdahl Home

Fire Up | Get Dirty | Scare Yourself | Bleed

Do More Than Just Survive…THRIVE

富士山 (Fuji San) in Pure Form

Fuji-san is a big deal.  It’s the highest point on all of Japan’s islands.  It’s on the ¥1000 note.  It’s the subject of countless photos, paintings, woodblock prints, poems… blog posts.

Katsushika, Hokusai, 1760-1849, artist | Teahouse at Koishikawa the morning after a snowfall
Between 1890 and 1940. Source: Library of Congress

富士山 may well be the world’s most climbed mountain- 250-300k people climb it every year.  The vast majority of these attempt it during the “official climbing season” of July and August.  At times, especially during Obon week, people have to wait in queues just to get to the next station. Continue reading 富士山 (Fuji San) in Pure Form

10 Tips to Help Your Camera Kit Thrive Where You Do

Near Thorong La, Nepal | 2011

In 2011 I had the opportunity to spend a few weeks in Nepal.  I traveled with a Canon Powershot G10 which is an amazing little monster, and great for travelers.  There were times, however, when I just didn’t have the focal range that I craved.  Some shots were  burned only to my mind because of the inherent limitations of a point-and-shoot camera.  (Check out the gallery at Rogue Images.)

This year, when I learned that I would make the journey one more time, I immediately began searching for a new toy.  Mirrorless system cameras like the Sony NEX or Olympus Pen lines really caught my eye due to their large, high quality sensors and compact body size.  For my money though, the technology is not quite there.  I wanted interchangeable lenses, great video capability, and most importantly, the ability to perform anywhere I perform. Continue reading 10 Tips to Help Your Camera Kit Thrive Where You Do

1,247 Reasons to Get a Reusable Water Container

On the small island of Okinawa, Japan there is an active community of climbers consisting of US service members and local Japanese nationals.  A favorite climb/boulder hangout is Gushichan beach on the South end of the island.  Not only is this beach home to hundreds of potential bouldering problems and even a few sport routes, it is one of many significant WWII historical sites on the island.  This beach is subject to busloads of tourists, typhoons, and multiple ocean currents.  Inevitably, it ends up trashed.

We met, one drizzly overcast day, to clean the place up.  This follow up to the original post documents the success: Continue reading 1,247 Reasons to Get a Reusable Water Container

Thrive Camillus Fixed Blade Knife

Check out this old Camillus military-issue fixed-blade knife that was recently renovated in true Thrive style.  Google is pretty sure that this is a Camillus CM-5684B, a relic of the Vietnam era (Source 1, and 2).

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It was a parting gift for a friend who was moving, and preparing to take on a great challenge.  Some serious Dremel action buffed off the phosphate coating and rust, and brought the high carbon steel to a mirror shine (note the second knife in it’s raw state for reference).  A bit of leather conditioner and black polish coaxed the sheath and handle back into service, and a length of cord with red beads retrofitted the leg tie.  Finally, a Lansky sharpening kit returned a surgeon’s edge to the beast.

The engraving reads, “FIRE UP – GET DIRTY – SCARE YOURSELF – BLEED” on one side of the blade.  The other side reads, “Do more than just survive…  THRIVE.”

It is more of a show piece now, but still a very capable tool if need be.

Do you possess any cool old toys like this one?  Shoot me some info in the comment box, or at thriveoutdoors@yahoo.com.  You could be featured in a future THRIVEtoys article!

Like blades?  You might also enjoy reading about the Bolo in, “So You Want to be John Rambo, Part I” and “Part II.”

-TO

10 Things to Wipe Your Butt With in the Woods

This post spawned from a lively discussion during the past weekend’s climbing trip to the Katsu-dake crags in Okinawa, Japan.  I must say that I have had many similar conversations, but this discussion in particular was quite in-depth.  A special thanks to the Okinawan climbing community for the inspiration!  I’m sure you are proud.

Disclaimer:  Some of the items listed are not necessarily “Eco-friendly.”  You are not a child.  If you use an unorthodox wiping material, then pack it out in a ziplock or poop-tube in accordance with local procedures.  No one wants to come across a nasty old sock with remnants of you all over it.

Photo by Justin Watters

Toilet paper, and my personal camping favorite- the baby wipe, are like the comfort food of sanitary products.  We get so used to using them in our day-to-day life  that it is nearly impossible to imagine what to do without them.Here are the facts:  1) You have to eat food to keep your energy level up.  2) Your body processes that food, and must dispose of the waste.  3) It is not healthy or comfortable to “hold it” until you find some porcelain.  4) If you hang out in the nature long enough you will eventually find yourself unprepared and without the standard issue material to clean up afterwards.

So…  Just what should you do?  What can you use to wipe your butt in the woods?  The most important thing to remember is not to panic.  Take a breath, turn your “woods-eyes” on, and you will probably find something that will work just as well, if not better than the real thing.  The second most important thing is to think of this before you settle into that  perfect little tree-well, not during.  Here’s 10 solid alternatives, listed in no discernible order: Continue reading 10 Things to Wipe Your Butt With in the Woods

The Time In Between

Welcome back to Thrive Outdoors!  It’s Friday here in the Land of the Rising Sun.  What better way to kick off the weekend than by scaring yourself?  Check out this great perspective on ditching your comfort zone through the eyes of our newest author, and get some inspiration for the weekend!

 

By Evan Crump

For a Wyoming boy like me, Southeast Asia was about as far from home as I could get. Before my trip I had only flown once and my traveling experience was confined to the Western United States and short stints in Mexico and Canada. I had not had a job in two years due to pharmacy school, but I had saved money from my school money for an emergency. I instead purchased a ticket to Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Jon, Alex, and I had never been there and just learned some phrases before we left. None of us would know anyone for thousands of miles. All we had were our backpacks and each other. None of us knew what the next 9 weeks would have in store for us…

Continue reading The Time In Between